Tuesday, December 21, 2010

The Census Bureau Reports the Evolving Face of America with sharpest Increases in Latino Communities!

LOS ANGELES, CA – Today, the United States Census Bureau released its state-by-state total population results for the 2010 Census, and with them the number of seats each state receives in the U.S. House of Representatives under reapportionment for the 113th Congress, which convenes in January 2013. The results show the U.S. population growth almost exclusively in the Western and Southern states, which led to Congressional gains in those states and losses in the Midwest and Northeast.
This growth corroborated the recently released 2009 ACS 1-year population estimates, which showed substantial growth of the Latino community in these same Western and Southern States since the 2000 Census.
"The Census will show that more than one in seven people in the United States is Latino. Today's data coupled with recently-released Census Bureau estimates demonstrate that the Latino population has significantly influenced how congressional seats are apportioned among the states. Further down the road, the nation can expect to see a minimum of nine additional Latino-majority House seats, provided that states comply with the federal Voting Rights Act in redistricting," said Thomas A. Saenz, Mexican American Legal Defense & Education Fund President and General Counsel.

· The 2010 Census showed the nation grew 9.7% since 2000. Based on the Census Bureau’s 2009 ACS 1-Year Estimates, the Latino population grew 37% from 2000 to 2009, where the non-Latino White population grew less than 3%. Stated otherwise, Latinos made up 51% of the United States total population growth, compared to non-Latino White population contributing 21% of the U.S. total population growth.
· Based on the ACS data, in the following 16 states Latino population growth accounted for more than 60% of the state’s total population growth: California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, and West Virginia. Latino population growth represents more than half the state’s population growth in 21 states.

In the eight states that gained Congressional Districts under the 2010 Census, the 2009 ACS data show that, with the exception of Florida and Texas, the Latino population grew more than 55%. In Texas and Florida, the Latino population grew a respective 37.16% and 48.82%. These relatively lower percentages represent large figures, with the states growing by 2,478,390 and 1,309,582 Latinos respectively.
“These data show that Latinos brought seats to states gaining districts, and prevented many other states from losing districts. As a result, the upcoming redistricting should be respectful of the growing Latino political strength,” stated Nina Perales, Mexican American Legal Defense & Education Fund National Senior Counsel.

Other Notable Highlights:
Texas gained 4 Congressional Seats, showing a 21% population growth. According to the ACS, the Latino population grew 37% while the non-Latino White population grew 6%. This also shows that Latinos made up 63% of Texas’s population growth.

California for the first time since 1930 did not gain a Congressional Seat. California grew 10% since 2000. The ACS showed a 25% growth in the Latino community, and a 3% loss in non-Latino White population; The Latino community represented 88% of the total population growth.

Arizona and Nevada each gained 1 congressional district, for total growth rates of 25% and 35%. Each state posted respective Latino population gains of 57% and 78% according to the ACS; which further represented 50% and 48% of each state’s population growth.

Florida gained 2 congressional seats with its 18% in total population growth. Florida posted a 49% Latino population growth via the ACS.


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Vicente Duque said...

New York Times : Gone With the Myths : Sesquicentennial of the Secession and the American Civil War - By EDWARD BALL - Myth : "This had nothing to do with Slavery !"

New York Times
Gone With the Myths
December 18, 2010


Some excerpts :

ON Dec. 20, 1860, 169 men — politicians and people of property — met in the ballroom of St. Andrew’s Hall in Charleston, S.C. After hours of debate, they issued the 158-word “Ordinance of Secession,” which repealed the consent of South Carolina to the Constitution and declared the state to be an independent country. Four days later, the same group drafted a seven-page “Declaration of the Immediate Causes,” explaining why they had decided to split the Union.

The authors of these papers flattered themselves that they’d conjured up a second American Revolution. Instead, the Secession Convention was the beginning of the Civil War, which killed some 620,000 Americans; an equivalent war today would send home more than six million body bags.

The next five years will include an all-you-can-eat special of national remembrance. Yet even after 150 years full of grief and pride and anger, we greet the sesquicentennial wondering, why did the South secede?

I can testify about the South under oath. I was born and raised there, and 12 men in my family fought for the Confederacy; two of them were killed. And since I was a boy, the answer I’ve heard to this question, from Virginia to Louisiana (from whites, never from blacks), is this: “The War Between the States was about states’ rights. It was not about slavery.”

I’ve heard it from women and from men, from sober people and from people liquored up on anti-Washington talk. The North wouldn’t let us govern ourselves, they say, and Congress laid on tariffs that hurt the South. So we rebelled. Secession and the Civil War, in other words, were about small government, limited federal powers and states’ rights.

But a look through the declaration of causes written by South Carolina and four of the 10 states that followed it out of the Union — which, taken together, paint a kind of self-portrait of the Confederacy — reveals a different story. From Georgia to Texas, each state said the reason it was getting out was that the awful Northern states were threatening to do away with slavery.


Vicente Duque

K. Andrew said...

That's odd. The Census.gov site that "State population counts for race and Hispanic or Latino categories" data won't be released until Febuary of 2011, and yet the LA Times has it already?


ultima said...

It's time for Hispanics to wake up and realize that this kind of growth is not in their best interests. Every new face is another competitor for jobs and resources and another step down the road toward the kind of country they abandoned when they came here. Welcome to Mexico Norte!

ultima said...

I'm am writing about growth in general. What are the limits of growth? When does growth begin to impact the quality of life and standard of living for all of us. What can you do to stabilize the U.S. population? It's sounds from the census data that the answers lie in the Hispanic communities across America because that is where most of the growth occurs.

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