Sunday, January 16, 2011

Why Didn't We Listen to Gabby Giffords


After the Healthcare Vote in March, 2010, sometime between midnight and 2am, Gabby Giffords' office's front door was kicked out/shot out/destroyed. Asked if she was fearful, Gabby responded: "We've had hundreds and hundreds of protesters congregate in front of our office corner. Rhetoric is incredibly heated. Calls. The emails. The slurs. Things have gotten spun up. Outbursts of violence. The yelling. It is really important that we focus that we have a democratic process. Gabby Giffords said Palin had put the “crosshairs of a gun sight over our district,” adding that “when people do that, they’ve got to realize there’s consequences to that action.” Chuck Todd then asked Giffords if “in fairness, campaign rhetoric and war rhetoric have been interchangeable for years.” She responded that colleagues who had been in the House “20, 30 years” had never seen vitriol this bad. But Todd moved on, and so did the Beltway. What’s the big deal about a little broken glass? Few wanted to see what Giffords saw — that the vandalism and death threats were the latest consequences of a tide of ugly insurrectionism that had been rising since the final weeks of the 2008 campaign and that had threatened to turn violent from the start.

What many people don't remember is Humphries role in this. Giffords’s
first brush with that reality had occurred some seven months before her office was vandalized — in the red-hot health care fever of August 2009. She had held another “Congress on Your Corner” meeting, at a Safeway in the town of Douglas. There the crowd’s rage and the dropping of a gun by one attendee prompted aides worried about her safety to summon the police. The Tucson Tea Party co-founder, Trent Humphries, told The Arizona Daily Star afterward that this was a lie, that “nobody was threatening Gabby.” After Loughner’s massacre, Humphries was still faulting her — this time for holding “an event in full view of the public with no security whatsoever.”

1 comment:

Vicente Duque said...

New York Times : "No One Listened to Gabrielle Giffords" : By FRANK RICH - Palin, Beck, Limbaugh and Tea Party are not responsible before a District Attorney and a Jury, but they have a Political Responsibility and can be criticized by you and me

Republicans are trying to stop the criticism of the Violent Speech of the Far Right : Sarah Palin, Glenn Beck, Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Bill O'Reilly, etc ..... - But if they have a right to speak so violently agitating fools then we have the right to denounce them for doing so.


The New York Times
No One Listened to Gabrielle Giffords
By FRANK RICH
January 15, 2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/opinion/16rich.html



Some excerpts :

Did Loughner see Palin’s own most notorious contribution to the rancorous tone — her March 2010 Web graphic targeting Congressional districts? We have no idea — nor does it matter. But Giffords did. Her reaction to it — captured in an interview she did back then with Chuck Todd of MSNBC — was the most recycled, if least understood, video of last week.

The week of that interview began with the House passing the health care bill on Sunday. Within hours, on Monday morning, vandals smashed the front door of Giffords’s office in Tucson. The Palin “target” map (and the accompanying Twitter dictum to “RELOAD”) went up on Tuesday, just one day after that vandalism — timing that was at best tone-deaf and at worst nastily provocative. Not just Giffords, but at least three other of the 20 members of Congress on the Palin map were also hit with vandalism or death threats.

In her MSNBC interview that Wednesday, Giffords said that Palin had put the “crosshairs of a gun sight over our district,” adding that “when people do that, they’ve got to realize there’s consequences to that action.” Chuck Todd then asked Giffords if “in fairness, campaign rhetoric and war rhetoric have been interchangeable for years.” She responded that colleagues who had been in the House “20, 30 years” had never seen vitriol this bad. But Todd moved on, and so did the Beltway. What’s the big deal about a little broken glass? Few wanted to see what Giffords saw — that the vandalism and death threats were the latest consequences of a tide of ugly insurrectionism that had been rising since the final weeks of the 2008 campaign and that had threatened to turn violent from the start.

Giffords’s first brush with that reality had occurred some seven months before her office was vandalized — in the red-hot health care fever of August 2009. She had held another “Congress on Your Corner” meeting, at a Safeway in the town of Douglas. There the crowd’s rage and the dropping of a gun by one attendee prompted aides worried about her safety to summon the police. The Tucson Tea Party co-founder, Trent Humphries, told The Arizona Daily Star afterward that this was a lie, that “nobody was threatening Gabby.” After Loughner’s massacre, Humphries was still faulting her — this time for holding “an event in full view of the public with no security whatsoever.”
.

Page Hits