Sunday, August 15, 2010

Happy Birthday Dora! We Love You!!


ON Aug. 14., 2000, Dora made her television debut on Nickelodeon and instantly made history as the first leading animated Latina character. The show debuted at number one and Dora has since become a friend to children around the globe.

The TV movie “Dora’s Big Birthday Adventure” (premiering Aug 15, 2010) celebrates her tenth year on the air and features guest stars Hector Elizondo, John Leguizamo and Rosie Perez. After the film, a short documentary will also pay tribute to the charismatic preschooler. Anderson Cooper, Soledad O’Brien, Sherri Shepherd and others will participate.

1 comment:

Vicente Duque said...

Wall Street Journal : Hispanics accounted for 54.7% of the total population increase between July 2008 and July 2009, but about two-thirds of that gain came from births. - Immigration is not the driving factor behind the nation's growing diversity

Minorities as a proportion of the under-15 population :

Hawaii 80.7%
Washington DC 78.0%
New Mexico 72.3%
California 71.2%
Texas 64.7%
Arizona 58.8%
Nevada 58.2%
Florida 52.3%
Maryland 51.o%
Georgia 50.5%

Source : Census Bureau

Wall Street Journal
U.S. Nears Racial Milestone
Whites Are on Verge of Becoming a Minority Among Newborns in Long-Expected Shift
By CONOR DOUGHERTY
JUNE 11, 2010

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704312104575298512006681060.html?mod=WSJ_WSJ_US_News_5


Some excerpts :

A number of forces are pushing the U.S. toward a "majority minority" future. The median age of the white population is older than that of nonwhites, and thus a larger share of minority women are in prime child-bearing years. In addition, white women are having fewer children than nonwhites, while the growth in mixed marriages has led to more multiracial births.

The recession has slowed the transformation by reducing immigration. It also has made people of all races less willing to start families. But births among nonwhites slowed less than those among whites between July 2008 and July 2009. Among the Hispanic population, there were roughly nine births for every one death, compared with a roughly one-to-one ratio for whites.

Minorities made up 35% of the U.S. population between July 2008 and July 2009, up from 31% in 2000, the Census said. While immigration is a touchy political issue, it is not the driving factor behind the nation's growing diversity. Hispanics, for instance, accounted for 54.7% of the total population increase between July 2008 and July 2009, but about two-thirds of that gain came from births.

Youth, Minorities, Demography and Politics :

Milenials.com

Vicente Duque

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